Janice Hill Pottery

Three-petaled bowl by Janice Hill Pottery, hand-thrown, wood-fired stoneware ceramics.
Green glazed bottle by Janice Hill Pottery, hand-thrown, hand-glazed porcelain ceramics.

Welcome to Janice Hill Pottery.  I make hand-thrown, hand-glazed pottery, and fire in both an electric kiln and a wood-fired kiln.   My pottery is food-safe, microwavable, and dish-washer safe.



Blue-glazed bottle by Janice Hill Pottery, hand-thrown, hand-glazed porcelain ceramics.
Pomegranate sphere by Janice Hill Pottery, hand-thrown, wood-fired stoneware ceramics.
Chrysanthemum sphere by Janice Hill Pottery, hand-thrown, hand-incised, wood-fired stoneware ceramics.

I make primarily wheel-thrown, functional pottery, that is characterized by elegant shapes, clean lines and precise throwing techniques.  I believe that the objects people use every day can be little works of art.



Bowls, plates and mugs by Janice Hill Pottery, hand-thrown, hand-glazed stoneware ceramics.
Janice Hill holding a large bowl she made. Hand-thrown, hand-glazed stoneware and porcelain pottery.

In 1990, I was about to finish up college when I got the news that I needed one more darn credit to graduate.  So I signed up for pottery.  From the first class I loved everything about working on the pottery wheel.  I have been throwing since then, in between teaching English for 16 years, raising a daughter, and running a small business. 






My Pottery Is Food Safe Dishwashable and Microwavable


Electric Kiln Wares: I fire in a kiln to cone 6 (2232 F). This is considered the middle range.  It combines the sturdiness of high-fired ware with energy conservation.   It also enables a wider and more-modern range of glaze colors.


Wood-Fired Wares: Twice a year, I join my follow Patsiliga Potters, and fire in a historic-style, outdoor wood kiln in Junction City, GA. This kiln was built in 2015 by Mike Buckner, owner of the Patsiliga Farm. It is a cross-draft railroad style, a type of kiln used in the American South in the 1830s.  This kiln goes to 11, which is considered high-fire.  Many of my pieces are replicas of traditional Georgia folk-pottery styles, and they are made with local clays and glaze materials.


Click to see my whiskey jugs,

syrup jugs and pitchers.